The DIVERSITY SUMMIT took place over two days, with participation of MIT’s senior leadership in Panels and Presentations, as well as a series of WORKSHOPS involving the MIT community.

The 2015 Diversity Summit continues to build upon our tradition of educating our community and providing opportunities to discuss this important topic in a candid and thought-provoking manner.

If you attended any part of the 5th annual Institute Diversity Summit, please GIVE US YOUR FEEDBACK! The short survey will be open until March 20, 2015.


Diversity Summit Day 1

EBSummitWatch a video of Ed Bertschinger’s Keynote at the Diversity Summit, January 29th from 1-2 pm.

Read the audience Commitments from Day 1 of the Diversity Summit.

Storify of Day #1


Diversity Summit Day 2

Gosline

Watch a video of the panel discussion with Chancellor Cynthia Barnhart, Executive Vice President and Treasurer Israel Ruiz, and Provost Martin Schmidt.

Watch a video of Keynote Speaker Professor Renée Richardson Gosline, MIT Sloan, on Diversity and Mindful Leadership – At MIT and in the World.

 


Program

Thursday January 29, 2015 (Day 1)
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Kresge Auditorium (W16)
Hacking the MIT Culture
Professor Ed Bertschinger, Institute Community and Equity Officer
2:15pm - 3:30 pm
Stratton Student Center (W20, third floor)

All Community Dialogues

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS:
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center (W20, 3rd Fl., Private Dining Rooms 1 & 2)
Intercultural Communication

This highly interactive, skills-based workshop will focus on how to communicate more effectively in an intercultural situation. Participants will be provided with a framework for understanding intercultural interactions, and through self-reflection, planning, and practice, will be able to both understand past situations in a new light and prepare for future interactions.

3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center (W20-407)
The Dynamics of Gender and Privilege

This interactive workshop will highlight the everyday bias and systemic issues of sexism and cis-gender privilege. For example, have you ever heard someone remark, "that test raped me" or “a woman’s place is in the kitchen” or “real men don’t cry”? Would you like to know if and how to respond? We will discuss issues of gender privilege at MIT through conversations around implicit bias and micro-aggressions, and think about ways to undo aspects of misogyny, patriarchy, transphobia, and rape culture. All are welcome.

While this workshop will be repeated on February 12th, interested participants need only register for one of the days.
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center (W20, 3rd Fl., Coffeehouse Lounge)
Ways to Advance a Respectful and Caring Community

What are the daily practices you can do to make a difference at MIT? How can you authentically “hack” your community? This workshop will review best practices for organizing within communities with a focus on inclusion. We will reflect on unconscious bias and building bridges, and ways to make a difference on campus.

While this workshop will be repeated on February 12th, interested participants need only register for one of the days.
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center (W20-306)
Does Race Still Matter?

Events surrounding the killing of Michael Brown in Missouri and Eric Garner in New York have re-ignited conversations about racism and discrimination in the United States. This panel will bring together scholars of religion, urban planning, architecture, and political science to examine issues that are a threat to advancing a respectful and caring community here at MIT and beyond.

Panel discussion with MIT faculty.
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center (W20-307)
The Challenge and Potential of Diversity for Decisionmaking

Laypeople, educators, organizations, and institutions regularly face difficult questions about how to handle issues of diversity and how to understand the value of differences. Working or interacting with different others can be a source of friction, even discomfort, but emerging research suggests that this friction also plays a critical role in preserving the objectivity and rationality of group decisions. This session will present recent research across domains of behavioral science that collectively illuminate the power of diverse environments to foster more accurate and thorough decisions, and the risk of homogeneous ones for skewing them.
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center
(W20-491)
Active Bystander & Speak Up Training Methods: Two Approaches to Responding to Bias

A bystander is a person who observes or experiences a conflict or an unacceptable behavior. An active bystander assesses the situation and speaks up by engaging in a constructive intervention. This session will provide an overview of the concept of the active bystander and present an approach to Active Bystander training using brief videotaped scenarios. We will present and demonstrate the Southern Poverty Law Center's "Speak Up" model.
5:00pm - 6:30pm

Stratton Student Center (W20-Third Floor)
Networking Reception
February 12, 2015
1:00pm - 2:30pm

Kresge Auditorium
Senior Leadership Panel Discussion

Chancellor Cynthia Barnhart
Executive Vice President and Treasurer Israel Ruiz
Provost Martin Schmidt
2:30pm - 3:30pm


Kresge Auditorium
Keynote Speaker
Prof. Renée Richardson Gosline
, MIT Sloan

Diversity and Mindful Leadership – At MIT and in the World

How does one become an effective leader in a diverse world? Working with various groups is not merely a “diversity” issue; it is a key success factor for all organizations and the leaders who steer them. This talk will apply principles of "mindfulness" to authentic leadership in a respectful and caring community.

Prof. Renée Richardson Gosline’s talk will address examples from social media, politics, marketing, and management. She will explore the importance of diversity to interpersonal dynamics and to effective and ethical leadership, both here at MIT and globally. She will also identify strategies that can help mindful leaders (at all levels of an organization and in broader society) make authentic connections with various audiences.

Renée Richardson Gosline is the Zenon Zannetos 1955 Career Development Assistant Professor of Marketing at MIT Sloan School of Management. She has been named one of the world’s top 40 business school professors under 40, and an MIT “Iron Professor.” Prof. Gosline holds a BA and MA in sociology, and a DBA in Marketing from Harvard University.
CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS:
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center
Reimagining Our Culture

This collaborative session offers members of the MIT community the opportunity to reconstruct our culture. There will be stations focusing on different aspects of MIT where you can share actionable and imaginative ideas through different media. We will focus on gender, but all ideas are welcome.
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center
The Dynamics of Gender and Privilege

This interactive workshop will highlight the everyday bias and systemic issues of sexism and cis-gender privilege. For example, have you ever heard someone remark, "that test raped me" or “a woman’s place is in the kitchen” or “real men don’t cry”? Would you like to know if and how to respond? We will discuss issues of gender privilege at MIT through conversations around implicit bias and micro-aggressions, and think about ways to undo aspects of misogyny, patriarchy, transphobia, and rape culture. All are welcome.

3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center
Ways to Advance a Respectful and Caring Community

What are the daily practices you can do to make a difference at MIT? How can you authentically “hack” your community? This workshop will review best practices for organizing within communities with a focus on inclusion. We will reflect on unconscious bias, building bridges, and ways to make a difference on campus.

3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center
Inclusive Communication & Event Planning

Whether you are faculty, staff or a student on campus, you want to be heard. Diversity and Inclusion is just that, welcoming all voices to the conversation. Are you and your peers mindful of communicating in an inclusive way? Can others access your message? Join us at a fun and informal workshop to learn what that means and how to add to your own communications toolset. We'll look at aspects that often arise in on-campus events, such as physical access to spaces, the use of sound systems and live captioning, and above all, the awareness that not everyone communicates in the same way.

3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center
Understanding Mental Health and Wellness

This workshop, sponsored by Active Minds, will provide an overview of mental health, discuss the highs and lows of academic life, and explore what is needed to create a community where everyone feels respected, supported, and cared for. Active Minds is a national organization that empowers students to speak openly about mental health in order to educate others and encourage help-seeking. The MIT chapter is a student-led initiative that works toward better health and wellness, stress relief, and health education at MIT.
3:45pm - 5:00pm

Stratton Student Center
Diversity and Culture at a Global MIT

MIT is a global campus. But does this mean that our campus is "diverse"? Students, faculty and staff from underrepresented groups remain in the minority at MIT. How is diversity as it is understood in a U.S.-centric context defined on a campus that is global? Do international cultural affiliations trump race and gender? How does our sense of who we are or perceived to be shift in different cultural contexts? This panel will shed light on how members of the community have experienced "otherness," both here on campus and around the world. We will hear from members of the community who have experienced questions of race and gender perceptions and stereotypes differently at MIT and abroad. We will talk about how intercultural communication skills can be applied right here at MIT.
5:00pm - 6:30pm
Networking Reception

Joachim Prinz: I Shall Not Be Silent

Date: February 5, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: MIT 32-123 (Kirsch Auditorium in the Stata Center)

A documentary film about Joachim Prinz, a rabbi who would not be silenced, from synagogues in 1930’s Berlin to the March on Washington in 1963. Following the film, representatives from the Jewish, Black and Muslim community will explore how we react to each others’ challenges.

Hosted by Rabbi Gavriel Goldfeder, MIT Hillel

Dear White People

Date: February 10, 2015

Cancelled due to MIT’s snow closing today

A social satire that follows the stories of four black students at an Ivy League college where controversy breaks out over a popular but offensive black-face party thrown by white students.The film explores racial identity in acutely-not-post-racial America while weaving a universal story of forging one’s unique path in the world. The film will be followed by a panel discussion.

Hosted by MIT Black Students’ Union (BSU)

Codebreaker

February 12, 2015
Time: 6:30-8p (screening); 8-9p (Q&A with Executive Producer/Creator Patrick Sammon)
Location: Sala de Puerto Rico (W20-202)

Codebreaker tells the remarkable and tragic story of one of the 20th century’s most important people. Alan Turing set in motion the computer age and his codebreaking helped turn the tide of World War II. His visionary brilliance was overshadowed by his conviction for “gross indecency” with another man. In despair, Turing died by suicide in 1954.

Following the screening from 6.30-8p will be an interactive discussion about the making of the film with the Executive Producer/Creator Patrick Sammon.

Hosted by Lincoln Laboratory Director’s Office and Out Professional Employees Network (OPEN)